The Dangers of Tailgating: Best Advice to Get Tailgaters to Back Off!

The Dangers of Tailgating: Best Advice to Get Tailgaters to Back Off!

You may think you are familiar with the dangers of tailgating, but did you know the simple act of tailgating puts motorcyclists at a staggering 27 times greater risk of death compared to car occupants according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration?

It’s enough to make any biker’s heart race. Imagine cruising down the open road, feeling the wind whip through your hair, only to see a big ass truck closing in quickly and hovering far too close for comfort to your rear wheel. The fear is real and justified, and the danger even more so.

The good news? Bikers have a secret weapon: the “back off” gesture, just one tool in your arsenal against this deadly threat. 

Let’s explore why tailgating is especially dangerous for motorcyclists, and what you can do to stay safe and avoid becoming a statistic.

Why tailgating is a problem: The real dangers of tailgating

Image of the headlights of a car as seen through the reflection in a rearview mirror of a motorcycle

Tailgating is more than just an annoyance—it’s a serious hazard, especially for motorcyclists! The close proximity of a vehicle tailgating a motorcycle reduces the margin for error and can quickly turn into a dangerous or even life-threatening situation.

In Iowa and across the Midwest, we all know the very real threat of a rogue deer suddenly jumping across your path. You quickly brake to avoid a collision, but The tailgating car behind you may not be ready for your sudden stop. The result? A potentially devastating chain-reaction accident.

Image of a deer crossing a highway

Imagine cruising down the highway, feeling the wind in your hair, when a car ahead of you slams on their brakes to avoid a pothole. You have enough time to react and slow down safely, but the tailgating car behind you doesn’t. The next thing you know, you’re rear-ended, potentially thrown from your bike, and facing serious injuries. 

So, how can motorcyclists avoid being tailgated and ensure their safety on the road?

Signaling the Tailgater: The Universal “Back Off” Gesture

Illustration demonstrating the universal hand gesture for "back off" shown by bikers to tailgating motorists

The first step in dealing with a tailgater is to communicate your discomfort and concerns before they become frustration or aggression. This can be done by signaling the tailgating motorist to back off. 

The universal signal for this is simple yet effective, and no, it does not involve raising a fist and extending one finger. Instead, extend your arm downward and repeatedly move the palm of your hand backward, as if physically pushing the car away. This non-verbal communication is generally recognized and respected by most motorists.

Here are a few tips to remember when signaling a tailgater:

  1. Make sure it’s safe to take one hand off the handlebars before signaling.
  2. Use clear, deliberate movements to ensure the tailgater understands your signal.
  3. Avoid aggressive or rude gestures that could escalate the situation.

Finding a Safe Place to Pull Over: Prioritizing Safety Over Speed

Close up photo of the back of a motorcycle that has pulled over safely to the side of the road.

If the tailgating motorist fails to respond and continues to follow too closely, the next best course of action is to locate a safe area to pull over and allow the tailgater to pass. It’s important to prioritize safety over speed or reaching your destination on time.

Speeding up is not a viable solution, as it will likely only result in being tailgated at an even higher speed. Once the tailgater has overtaken you, you can continue to enjoy your ride safely.

The Importance of Maintaining a Safe Distance: The Three-Second Rule

Image illustrating stationary points for counting the 3-second rule for following in traffic

Here is the best way to gauge a safe following distance:

  1. Choose a fixed point ahead of the vehicle in front of you (also known as “stationary points”.
  2. When the vehicle in front passes that point, start counting seconds.
  3. If you pass the same point before you finish counting to three, you’re following too closely.

If you’ve made it this far in the article, it should be obvious that maintaining a safe distance on the road is crucial for all vehicles, including motorcycles, to help avoid the dangers of tailgating.

If a biker tailgates a car, they risk a dangerous collision. Trailing vehicles should keep a three-second (or more) margin between the front of the following vehicle and the rear end of the vehicle being followed. This three-second safety margin is proven to significantly reduce the chance of being involved in a rear-end collision, ensuring safer roads for everyone.

If riding in a group, consider following the three-second rule while riding in “staggered formation” as shown below.

Image demonstrating the proper way to ride staggered formation on a motorcycle

Hit the Brakes, Not the Road: Don’t Let a Tailgate Ruin Your Ride

Remember that terrifying near-miss we talked about earlier? Imagine the consequences if the car behind you wasn’t just tailgating, but slamming into your back wheel. Scary stuff, right? Unfortunately, this isn’t just some hypothetical scenario to highlight the dangers of tailgating. These situations happen more often than they should, and motorcyclists often bear the brunt of the damage, both physically and financially.

That’s where knowing your rights comes in. Don’t just dust yourself off and move on if you’ve been injured in an accident thanks to an accident caused by a tailgating motorist. You deserve compensation for your medical bills, bike repairs, and lost wages. But navigating the legal system can be daunting, especially when you’re recovering from an injury.

Image of a biker on the side of a highway with his motorcycle as he contemplates next steps after a close call with a car tailgating him.

That’s why there are lawyers who specialize in fighting for the rights of injured motorcyclists. They understand the unique challenges you face and know how to build a strong case against negligent drivers.

Here’s the bottom line: You shouldn’t have to shoulder the burden of an accident caused by someone else’s recklessness. By seeking legal support, you can hold the tailgater accountable. This means you’ll get the compensation you deserve to get back on your feet (and back on the road safely).

Remember: Riding a motorcycle is about freedom, not fear. By taking steps to stay safe, you can minimize the risk of tailgating incidents.


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From Road Rash to Safe Slides: The Importance of Motorcycle Safety Gear

From Road Rash to Safe Slides: The Importance of Motorcycle Safety Gear

The Choice: Sweat or Bleed – The Unspoken Truth About Motorcycle Safety Gear

The choice between sweating a little in protective gear or bleeding on the asphalt is a no-brainer. Yet, many riders still debate the necessity of motorcycle safety gear. Let’s dive into the world of motorcycle safety and understand why protective gear is not just a choice but a lifesaver.

The Miraculous Recovery of Racers

Image of a  High speed motorcycle racing on an enclosed track

We’ve all seen it – a motorcycle racer takes a nasty spill during a high-speed race, only to bounce back up, rush to their bike, and rejoin the race as if nothing happened. It’s nothing short of miraculous. 

But what’s their secret? It’s not some superhuman ability; it’s their protective gear.


Helmets: The First Line of Defense

Stylized cinematic image of a motorcycle rider wearing a full-face helmet, showcasing its protective features.

Every rider knows the importance of a helmet. Why? Because wearing the right helmet is all about protecting the most vital part of your body. Helmets are designed to absorb the impact and reduce the risk of traumatic brain injuries.

Whether you prefer full-face, open-face, or half helmets, ensuring it fits correctly and meets safety standards is crucial.


The Gruesome Reality of Road Rash

An infographic showing the different degrees of road rash, from mild to severe with text that reads "Road Rash Mild to Severe"

Imagine sliding across the rough asphalt at high speeds. Your mind is racing. A “few scratches” is the last thing you’re thinking about, right? Maybe it is, or maybe it’s the only thing you can think about as you slide and tumble and feel the flesh rip away against the rough asphalt.

The True Dangers of Road Rash

Without protective gear, the road acts like a relentless cheese grater against the skin. Road rash isn’t just a few scratches or a minor inconvenience; it can range from a superficial rug burn-like injury to a severe third-degree wound that demands immediate medical attention and has a high risk of infection.

Make no mistake. Road Rash is a kind of personal injury after a motorcycle wreck that should not be ignored, downplayed, or underestimated.

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Dressing for the Season – and Safety

A side-by-side comparison of regular jeans and Kevlar jeans after a drag test.

As the chilly winds of fall approach, riders often bundle up to keep warm. But this seasonal attire can serve a dual purpose: warmth and protection. Why not ensure that our gear, whether for warmth or style, also offers the best protection against potential accidents?

In a revealing material drag test here’s how various forms of leg protection stood up:

  1. Regular jeans gave way in less than 4 feet at 35 mph. 
  2. Kevlar jeans lasted a commendable 22 feet at the same speed.
  3. Heavy leathers lasted a whopping 86 feet at 35 mph. 

It’s often said that “ya get what ya pay for,” but these numbers alone should make the case for investing in quality protective gear.

“What makes Kevlar so effective?”

Though it may be known for bulletproof vests, most people don’t realize just how versatile Kevlar is. Kevlar, a synthetic fiber developed by DuPont in the 1960s, has become synonymous with high-strength and protective applications, from bulletproof vests to motorcycle gear.

Top 8 reasons Kevlar is effective:
  1. High Tensile Strength: Kevlar’s tensile strength, which is the measure of how much pulling (or tension) a material can withstand without breaking, is about five times stronger than steel on an equal weight basis. This means that Kevlar can absorb and dissipate energy from impacts or abrasions very effectively.
  2. Lightweight: Despite its strength, Kevlar is lightweight. This combination of strength and low weight makes it ideal for protective clothing, allowing wearers to remain agile.
  3. Thermal Stability: Kevlar doesn’t melt or start to get soft. It can withstand temperatures up to about 450°C (842°F) before it begins to degrade, making it resistant to heat and flame.
  4. Chemical Resistance: Kevlar is chemically stable and is resistant to many harsh chemicals, solvents, and oils. This property ensures that its strength and integrity are maintained even in challenging environments.
  5. Low Elongation at Break: This means that Kevlar doesn’t stretch much before breaking. In the context of protective gear, this ensures that the material doesn’t deform easily upon impact, providing consistent protection.
  6. Woven Structure: When used in protective gear, Kevlar is often woven into a fabric. This woven structure provides a network of fibers that can spread out the force of an impact, reducing the risk of penetration or abrasion.
  7. Layering: In many protective applications, multiple layers of Kevlar are used to enhance its protective capabilities. The layers can move against each other, further dissipating the energy of an impact.
  8. Durability: Kevlar fibers are resistant to wear, tear, and age, ensuring that products made from them have a long lifespan.

Kevlar’s properties make it particularly effective at preventing road rash. When a rider falls, the abrasion resistance of Kevlar can prevent the asphalt from reaching the skin, while its high tensile strength can reduce the risk of the gear tearing upon impact.


Kevlar Jeans vs. Heavy Leathers: An Unbiased Comparative Look at Motorcycle Protection

Image of a man wearing leathers on a motorcycle with Kevlar in the background

When it comes to motorcycle safety gear, riders often find themselves choosing between Kevlar jeans and heavy leathers. Both offer protection, but they come with distinct advantages and considerations. Let’s break down the benefits and differences of each:

Kevlar Jeans:

  • Lightweight and Comfortable: Kevlar jeans provide a more casual and comfortable fit compared to heavy leathers. They’re designed to look and feel like regular jeans, making them suitable for everyday wear.
  • Abrasion Resistance: Kevlar, a synthetic fiber, is known for its high tensile strength. When woven into jeans, it offers impressive abrasion resistance, protecting the skin during slides.
  • Versatility: Kevlar jeans are versatile and can be worn in various settings, not just while riding. They’re ideal for riders who want protection without changing outfits after reaching their destination.
  • Breathability: These jeans tend to be more breathable than heavy leathers, making them a preferred choice in warmer climates.

Heavy Leathers:

  • Superior Protection: Heavy leathers offer unmatched protection against abrasions, cuts, and impacts. They’ve been the go-to choice for professional racers for decades.
  • Durability: Leather is naturally tough and can withstand repeated wear and tear. With proper care, leather gear can last for years.
  • Weather Resistance: Leather provides a natural barrier against wind and light rain, making it suitable for rides in varying weather conditions.
  • Fit and Form: Heavy leathers, especially those designed for racing, often come with a snug fit, reducing the risk of the material bunching up and causing discomfort or reduced protection during a slide.

While both Kevlar jeans and heavy leathers offer protection for riders, the choice often boils down to the rider’s specific needs and preferences. For everyday commuting and a more casual look, Kevlar jeans are an excellent choice. However, for those seeking maximum protection, especially during high-speed rides or on tracks, heavy leathers remain the gold standard.

Regardless of the choice, ensuring the gear fits correctly and is worn consistently is key to maximizing safety, and either choice is better than shorts!


Beating the Heat with the Right Gear

A biker wearing a mesh textile jacket, with a focus on the breathable fabric and body armor.

One common gripe among riders is the heat associated with safety gear, especially during the scorching summer months. But here’s the catch: not all protective gear is sweltering.

Mesh textile jackets with body armor (as seen above), for instance, can be cooler than a basic sleeveless t-shirt. The key is airflow. Once you stop, shedding the jacket can prevent overheating.

For those who find chaps or riding pants too stifling, products like the CoolAir Mesh Bohn armored pants offer a breezy alternative. Designed to be worn under jeans, they provide crucial protection without the heat.


Visibility Matters: Shine Bright on the Road

A biker wearing a jacket with reflective stripes, visible in low light.

Safety isn’t just about protection from impact; it’s also about being seen. Especially during night rides, rain, or foggy conditions, reflective patches or stripes on your gear can make a world of difference. They ensure that other motorists spot you from a distance, reducing the chances of accidents.

Chosing the right reflective gear for night rides can be nearly as important as making sure you have a great working headlight on your bike.


Protecting the Extremities

A close-up of a biker's hands gripping the handlebars, showcasing heavy leather gloves with reinforced knuckles.

Your hands and feet are especially vulnerable in a crash. Investing in gloves and boots with adequate padding can make a world of difference. From heavy leather options to lighter variants for warmer weather, there’s a glove for every rider and every condition.


“How often should I replace my safety gear?”

Two motorcycle helmets side-by-side. The one on the left is old and worn, the second on the right is new with updated safety features.

Just like your motorcycle, your gear also needs regular checks and maintenance. Cleaning your helmet visor ensures clear visibility. Checking for wear and tear, especially in protective padding, ensures they provide maximum protection. And remember, if a piece of gear has been through an accident, it might be time to replace it, even if it looks okay. Safety gear is designed to absorb impact, and its protective qualities might be compromised after a crash.

Remember, if a piece of gear has been through an accident, it might be time to replace it, even if it looks okay.

The Price of Safety vs. The Cost of Neglect

Yes, quality protective gear can be pricey. But when you weigh the costs – pain, medical bills, potential loss of income, and the sheer trauma of an accident – that price suddenly seems trivial. As the old saying goes, “It’s better to sweat than to bleed.” So, the next time you gear up for a ride, remember: your safety is in your hands. Choose wisely.


Your Safety Net After the Ride

Image of The Biker Lawyers standing by their motorcycles

Accidents happen, even to the most cautious and geared-up riders. If you or someone you know has been injured while riding, don’t navigate the aftermath alone. The Biker Lawyers are here to support and guide you. We understand the unique challenges bikers face and are committed to ensuring you get the justice and compensation you deserve.

Contact us today for a free consultation and let us be your road to recovery.

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How to Avoid Crashing a Motorcycle

How to Avoid Crashing a Motorcycle

Top 10 Rules of the Road: Avoiding Motorcycle Crashes Like a Pro

On two wheels, safety isn’t just important, it’s everything. For that very reason, we’ve crafted a list of the top 10 lifesaving rules to keep you upright on your ride. These aren’t rocket science but following them religiously can significantly trim down the chances of a nasty surprise. This is how to avoid crashing a motorcycle.

Here’s a quick rundown of the tips. Once you check it out, keep scrolling for a bit more about our logic for each.

1. The Cardinal Rule: Always Be on Alert

Image from the perspective of a motorcyclist demonstrating alert perceptions while riding

Think every driver out there is out to get you. Assume that they’re going to make a wrong move that could put you in harm’s way. That guy cruising towards the intersection? Expect a sudden left turn. That woman at the crossroads? Be ready for her to bolt just as you get there. Speaking of Intersections…

Image of motorcyclists demonstrating how to safely cross an intersection

2. Beware the Intersection

Intersections are like the Wild West of roads. They’re unpredictable. Even if you don’t see any cars, slow down. Remember, preparedness is key, and it’s easier to respond to surprises when you’re not blazing through like a comet.

Image of a frightened driver with a focus on his eyes.

3. Don’t Trust the Eyes

It might look like a driver has locked eyes with you, but here’s the truth: they’re often looking right past you. You’re on two wheels, they’re scanning for four. You’re practically invisible to them.

Image of a car turning in an intersection.

4. Trust the Wheels

The wheels, though, they don’t lie. A driver’s eyes might deceive you, but the wheels give it away. If they twitch, you twitch and prepare for them to burst into your path.

Image of a motorcyclist surrounded by cars with the potential to turn into a "lethal-Left" situation

5. Prepare for the Lethal Left

Always assume the oncoming car is going to make a sudden left turn right in front of you. Ease off the gas, hover over the brakes, and be ready for some fast action.

Image of a motorcycle that has crashed.

6. Find a Shield

Whenever possible, go through intersections with another vehicle beside you. It’s not foolproof, but if someone’s gonna run a red light, better they hit your metal buddy than you.

Close-up image of tire tread

7. Check Your Ride

Give your tires a once-over before you roll out. Badly inflated tires can cause serious trouble at high speed, and you don’t want a blowout on the open road.

Image of several bikers riding motorcycles- each controlling the space around them

8. Control Your Space

If someone’s tailgating you, wave them back. If they don’t take the hint, pull over and let them speed away. They’re a hazard you don’t need.

Image of a person on a motorcycle at an intersection looking at the camera as if it were another motorist

9. Create Your Buffer

If a car passes you and pulls in too close, ease back and re-establish your safety zone. You need space to react if something suddenly appears in your path.

Image of Pete Leehey and Dan Matzdorff demonstrating proper distancing while riding a motorcycle

10. Keep Your Distance

Don’t tailgate. Keep a solid three-second safety buffer between you and the traffic ahead. You want space to react, not a windshield for a face mask.

Wrap Up

These are the rules of the road, the biker’s bible for staying safe out there. But hey, we’re all human, and stuff happens. If you ever find yourself in a scrape, get medical help pronto, and once that’s taken care of, reach out to pro motorcycle accident attorneys like Pete Leehey and Dan Matzdorff. They’ve been there, done that, and can guide you on what to do next.Call to action Image- A motorcycle riding down a highway with text encouraging the viewer to call The Biker Lawyers for a free consultation

Motorcycle Safety Tips: Navigating the Thrills and Risks of Motorcycling

Motorcycle Safety Tips: Navigating the Thrills and Risks of Motorcycling

Riding with Respect: Balancing the Thrill and Risk of Motorcycling

In this article, we’ll cover basic motorcycle safety tips, statistics, and more.

As the rumble of our engines echoes down the open road and the wind whips past, there’s no denying the exhilarating freedom and adrenaline rush that comes with riding a motorcycle. 

The Thrill and Risk of Motorcycling

Blurry image of a man riding a motorcycle down an empty Iowa Highway

We, at The Biker Lawyers, get it; we’re bikers too. But it’s essential to face the stark reality of the inherent risks that come along with our shared passion.

The Real Risks: NHTSA Motorcycle Safety Statistics

Recent statistics from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) reveal a sobering truth: motorcyclists are a staggering 28 times more likely to die in a crash than car occupants. 

To put that into perspective, that’s like the odds of winning the longshot bet at the Kentucky Derby – but with a far grimmer prize at stake.

Essential Motorcycle Safety Measures

So, how can we tip the scales in our favor, ensuring that we can enjoy the ride while also making it home safely at the end of the day? 

Helmet Safety: A Life-Saving Accessory

Closeup shot of a motorcycle helmet and a riding glove

First and foremost, the importance of wearing a helmet cannot be overstated. While it may not be the most glamorous part of your biking gear, it’s the most critical. Helmets can reduce the risk of head injury by a significant 69%, and death by 37%. It’s not just about looking cool; it’s about keeping your brain, your most vital organ, safe.

Rules of the Road: Staying Safe While Enjoying the Ride

Secondly, follow the rules of the road diligently. This means no speeding, no weaving through traffic like a Hollywood stuntman, no running red lights, no tailgating, and absolutely no drinking and driving. These rules aren’t there to ruin your fun; they exist to keep us all safe.

Sharing the Road: A Message to Car Drivers

Image of a man on a motorcycle at an intersection.

However, the responsibility doesn’t lie solely on the shoulders of motorcycle riders. Drivers of larger vehicles also need to play their part in keeping our roads safe. To avoid crashes, we must all work diligently to share the road

Motorcycles might be smaller, but they’re not invisible, and treating them as such can have deadly consequences. It’s imperative that car drivers stay alert, give motorcycles the space they need, and extend the same respect they would to any other vehicle on the road. After all, behind every set of handlebars is a real person with a life worth protecting.

The joy of motorcycling doesn’t have to be overshadowed by risk. By adopting the right safety measures and promoting mutual respect on the road, we can all help ensure that our two-wheeled adventures end with kickstands down and stories to tell, not a tragedy. 

Decorative image of The Biker Lawyers, Personal Injury lawyers

Stay safe out there, fellow riders. And remember, The Biker Lawyers are here for you should you ever need legal assistance or advice.

20 Motorcyclist Tips for 2023

20 Motorcyclist Tips for 2023

20 Motorcyclist Tips for 2023

Posted on January 9, 2023 at 11:11 AM by The Biker Lawyers

20 things every motorcyclist should know before hitting the road

Introduction

Motorcycling is an exhilarating and liberating way to travel, but it’s important to remember that your safety should always be the top priority. This article is dedicated to providing you with the best advice on how to stay safe while riding your motorcycle in 2023.

Whether you’re a new or experienced rider, you’ll find some useful tips here on wearing the right protective gear, obeying traffic laws, and still having fun.

Keep reading to learn more about how to stay safe and enjoy your ride.

1. Wear appropriate protective gear.

Yes, when we say wear appropriate protective gear, that means including a helmet, gloves, eye protection, leather or heavy-duty textile jacket and pants, and boots that cover your ankles.

Gear Matters. Use a high-quality motorcycle helmet that fits properly and meets current safety standards. Use eye protection as well as face protection when riding at night or in inclement weather. Wear long pants to protect your skin from road rash in the event of a fall.

2. Learn and obey traffic laws and regulations.

Motorcyclists should always know and obey the traffic laws and regulations of the road before hitting the highway. As a biker, it is important to familiarize yourself with the rules of the road, including speed limits, right-of-way laws, and helmet laws.

Obeying traffic laws and regulations is essential for keeping both you and other drivers safe on the road.

3. Stay alert and be aware of your surroundings, including other vehicles and pedestrians.

Riding a motorcycle can be an exhilarating experience, but it also comes with its own set of challenges.

To ensure you stay safe while on the road, it’s important to stay alert and be aware of your surroundings, including other vehicles and pedestrians. Always look both ways before crossing an intersection, and be sure to give yourself plenty of space when passing other vehicles. Try to anticipate the actions of others on the road, and be aware of any blind spots or areas of limited visibility.

If you’re riding in a group, be sure to communicate with the other riders and maintain a safe distance between motorcycles. By being aware of your environment and staying alert, you can ensure a safe and enjoyable ride.

4 Familiarize yourself with your motorcycle and its controls.

It is essential for all motorcyclists to familiarize themselves with their motorcycles and their controls before hitting the road. Knowing how your motorcycle operates and how to use the brakes, throttle, and the clutch is vital for a safe and enjoyable ride.

Veteran Road Warrior Tip:

“Ensure you have a “heel kick” up-shift arm on shifter. Most often, your winter weather footwear will not fit under the “toe lift” of shifter. I recommend this vs. removing shifter and adjusting for footwear.”

-Richard Brockmeyer via Facebook

Uneven road surfaces can cause your motorcycle to wobble and can be dangerous

5. Reduce speed in adverse weather conditions such as rain, fog, and snow.

Riding a motorcycle in adverse weather conditions such as rain, fog, and snow can be dangerous and should be avoided if possible. However, if it can’t be avoided, it is essential that motorcyclists reduce their speed while riding in these conditions. Lower visibility, wet roads, and slick surfaces can make it difficult to control your bike and can increase the risk of an accident.

To reduce the risk of an accident, motorcyclists should reduce their speed and maintain a safe distance from other vehicles. Additionally, they should consider wearing rain gear and other protective gear to stay safe and dry. Taking the necessary precautions can help you stay safe and enjoy your ride even in the worst weather conditions.

6. Increase the distance between you and other vehicles.

Motorcyclists should always remember that they are at a higher risk of being involved in an accident and should drive defensively. Motorcycles are smaller than cars and therefore harder for other drivers to see. Because bikers have less protection from impact, they may suffer serious injuries from even minor accidents.

7. Maintain a safe following distance when riding in a group.

It is important for motorcyclists to maintain a safe following distance when riding in a group. This ensures that all riders have enough time to react to any unexpected hazards or changes in the road. Following too closely can cause an accident if the rider in front has to suddenly brake, and the rider behind does not have enough time to respond.

When riding in a group, it is best to leave at least three seconds between each bike. If riding in a staggered formation, the bikes traveling closest to the centerline should have a three-second gap between them. The bikes in the fog line lane should follow this same rule.

The gaps between the bikes near the center line and near the fog line should have at least 1.5 seconds between them. This way, each rider has enough time to react to any changes on the road and can feel safe and secure.

8. Avoid lane splitting when in traffic.

Lane splitting, or riding between lanes of stopped or slow-moving traffic, is an incredibly dangerous practice for motorcyclists.

Not only is it illegal in most states, but it can also be dangerous for other drivers and yourself. It is much safer to stay in your designated lane and drive in the same direction as the flow of traffic. Motorcyclists should be aware of the laws in their state and always ride responsibly and safely.

Additionally, lane splitting can be especially dangerous if it is done too quickly, so it is important to maintain a safe speed and distance when riding in traffic.

9. Be aware of uneven road surfaces and potholes.

As you ride, be sure to keep watch for uneven road surfaces and potholes. Uneven road surfaces can cause your motorcycle to wobble and can be dangerouswhile potholes can cause you to lose control of your motorcycle.

Both of these road hazards can be difficult to spot while riding, so it is important to be extra vigilant while looking out for them. Be prepared to take evasive action and slow down if you do notice them. Also, be sure to check the road surface ahead and to the sides of you before changing lanes or taking a corner.

10. Anticipate other drivers’ actions and be prepared to take evasive action.

Call it riding with your head on a swivel, call it cautious driving. Whatever you call it, it is important to be aware of your surroundings and to always practice defensive driving. This means being aware of other drivers on the road, watching for potential obstacles, and anticipating the actions of other drivers.

11. Use your signals and be courteous to other drivers.

Before hitting the road, especially if you are a new rider, make sure to brush up on the basics like signaling when turning and changing lanes.

Being courteous to other drivers should also be a priority, as a motorcyclist is much more vulnerable than a car driver. For instance, if you see a car trying to make a left turn in front of you, don’t speed up to get in front of them (a great way to learn about the “Lethal Left” the wrong way).

Instead, slow down and give them plenty of space to make the turn safely. By using your signals and being courteous to other drivers, you can help to ensure a safe ride for everyone. Also, and we know we mentioned this before but it is worth repeating, watch for pedestrians.

12. Be prepared to take evasive action if necessary, such as riding in a zigzag pattern or braking hard.

Motorcyclists should always be aware of their surroundings and know how to respond if a situation arises that requires evasive action. This might include riding in a zigzag pattern to throw off a tailgater, or braking hard in order to avoid hitting an obstacle.

It’s also important to know how to maneuver your motorcycle in a tight space and be able to quickly shift your weight in order to make quick turns. Being prepared to take evasive action can help you to avoid an accident and keep you safe on the road.

13. Inspect your motorcycle before each ride and check the brakes, lights, tires, and fluid levels.

Motorcycling is a great way to explore the world and get a sense of freedom, but it is important for riders to remember that safety should always be their priority. It’s good to do a deep dive inspection of your bike at the beginning and end of riding season, but before each ride, take a few minutes to inspect your motorcycle and check the brakes, lights, tires, and fluid levels.

This is key to making sure your motorcycle is in top condition and that you are prepared for the ride ahead.

Click below for a FREE Motorcyle Check-up Checklist!

Make sure to check the tire pressure, oil levels, and brake fluid, and also look for any signs of wear or tear that could cause a problem on the road. Additionally, ensure that all lights are working properly and that your brakes are in good condition. Taking the time to properly inspect your motorcycle before each ride will help you stay safe and enjoy your time on the road.

14. Don’t drink and ride.

Motorcycle riders should never drink and ride. Alcohol impairs the rider’s judgment, coordination, and reaction time, making it extremely dangerous for anyone to operate a motorcycle after drinking.

Even a small amount of alcohol can increase the chances of an accident, and the consequences of such an accident are often severe. Not only can you be charged with a DUI, but you can also face serious physical injuries, fines, and even jail time. Always remember to never drink and ride, and to always ride responsibly.

15. Don’t ride when you’re fatigued and don’t ride if you’re feeling ill or taking medication that could impair your judgment or coordination.

Always be sure to ride with a clear and alert mind. Don’t hit the road if you’re feeling fatigued or if you’re taking any medications that can impair your judgment or coordination. Make sure you get plenty of rest before getting on your bike and take regular breaks during long rides. Following these basic rules will help ensure you’re fit to ride and that you stay safe on the roads.

16. Make sure you have good insurance including UM/UIM.

No biker should ever hit the road without having quality insurance coverage. It’s important to make sure you have insurance that covers you in the event of an accident, including Uninsured/Underinsured Motorist coverage.

UM/UIM coverage helps to protect you if you are hit by a driver who either has no insurance or does not have enough insurance to cover the full extent of the damages. Without this coverage, you could be stuck with a hefty bill if you are injured in an accident caused by an uninsured or underinsured driver. Make sure you have the right insurance coverage for your motorcycle before you hit the road.

17. Keep your motorcycle in good condition and service it regularly.

Motorcyclists should always keep their bikes in good condition, especially before a ride. Regular maintenance and servicing is essential to ensure your safety and the performance of your motorcycle.

Inspect your brakes, tires, lights, and oil level before every ride. It’s also important to check the chain and sprockets for wear and tear, as well as any loose nuts or bolts. Additionally, be sure to check the fluid levels in your engine, and replace them when needed.

Regularly servicing your bike is the key to keeping it running smoothly and safely. If you don’t feel comfortable doing the maintenance yourself, don’t hesitate to take it to a professional. Taking the proper steps to ensure the safety of your bike will help you enjoy your ride for many years to come.

18. Know the local laws and regulations in the areas you plan to ride.

Before hitting the road on your motorcycle, it’s important to know the local laws and regulations in the areas you plan to ride.

Depending on your location, traffic laws and regulations may vary. Be sure to familiarize yourself with motorcycle regulations and traffic laws, as well as any other specific requirements you may encounter. Make sure you have all the necessary documents, such as a valid license, registration, and insurance.

Also, ensure that your motorcycle is in good condition and that you have the proper safety gear and equipment. Following the local regulations and laws can help you stay safe and avoid any legal issues.

19. Never ride beyond your capabilities.

Motorcyclists should never ride beyond their capabilities. No matter how experienced you are, it is always important to stay within your skillset and abilities when riding on the road.

Riding beyond your capabilities can lead to dangerous situations and even catastrophic accidents. Before hitting the road, always practice your skills and make sure you are comfortable with the bike and the environment you plan to ride in.

It is also important to understand the limits of the motorcycle and to never exceed them. Responsible riders always keep safety in mind and make sure they are riding in a safe and controlled manner.

20. Have fun and enjoy the ride!

Riding a motorcycle is one of the most exhilarating forms of transportation. Before you hit the open road, make sure to take the necessary precautions to keep yourself safe.

Be sure to review your bike’s owner’s manual and always wear a helmet and other protective gear. Additionally, be sure to check the weather and road conditions before you leave and be sure to know the rules of the road.

Conclusion

With these basic safety measures taken care of, you can relax and enjoy the ride. Cruise down the highway and take in the fresh air and beautiful scenery. Whether you’re out for a short ride or a long journey, remember to keep your eyes open, your head of a swivel, and have fun!

 

This article was brought to you by the personal injury lawyers at The Biker Lawyers, PC.

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