Handle Insurance Adjusters Like a Pro After a Motorcycle Accident

Handle Insurance Adjusters Like a Pro After a Motorcycle Accident

God, I love this time of year, don’t you? Look, we’re going to talk about how to deal with insurance adjusters after a crash in a second but let’s just take a moment to appreaciate how great it is to ride in Minnesota and Iowa in the fall.

Seriously, there’s nothing quite like the freedom of the open road, the wind in your face, the roar of your bike beneath you. The beauty of the changing colors of the trees as autumn sets in… there really isn’t anything like it.

Image of a motorcycle rushing down an open highway in the Autumn

 Unfortunately, not all roads are smooth.

When the unexpected happens, and you find yourself picking up the pieces after a motorcycle crash, all that freedom can feel like it’s been replaced with a mountain of stress and uncertainty. Suddenly, you’re thrust into a world of insurance claims, repair costs, and medical bills. 

watercolor splash representation of a motorcycle accident on a highway. The motorcycle is seen toppled and the fluid strokes and splashes of color spread away from the crash

And as if that’s not enough, you’re now faced with the daunting task of dealing with an insurance adjuster. Sure, they might seem friendly, but remember, their job is to save their company money, not to make your life easier.

It’s a tough situation, especially here in the Midwest where most of us were raised being “Iowa (or Minnesota) Nice.” It can feel like it goes against our nature to not be as helpful as possible, especially in stressful situations.

Yeah, it’s a tricky road, but with the right knowledge and guidance, you can navigate this challenging time and get back on the road where you belong (without accidentally screwing yourself over in the process).

So you’ve been in a crash?

Watercolor splash style paining depicting a motorcycle accident on a highway

It’s time for some straight-talking advice on how to handle insurance adjusters after a motorcycle accident.

Remember, no matter how friendly they may be, the insurance adjuster works for the insurance company, not for you. Their job is to settle your claim for as little as possible. 

6 Essential Tips for Dealing with Insurance Adjusters After a Motorcycle Accident

Watercolor splash image of a greedy insurance executive and a pile of money

1. Don’t Feel Pressured to Give a Statement

After an accident, you might get a call from the other party’s insurance adjuster. Remember, you’re not obliged to give a statement right away. You might still be rattled by the accident, and that’s not the best time to be giving details that could be used against you later. It’s okay to wait until you have a lawyer by your side.

2. Keep It Basic

If you do decide to talk to the insurance adjuster, stick to the basics. Be very accurate and “to the point” in answering questions. Answer their questions, but don’t offer any details beyond what they specifically ask you. Do not tell the adjuster the crash was your fault, even a percentage. Those details could be twisted and used against you when it comes to settling your claim.

3. Stick to the Facts

When you describe the accident, keep it factual. Don’t make assumptions or guesses. Do not make guesses about speed, distance, or time. Guesses of this nature are usually wrong, and can only hurt you.  The more detail you give, the more chance there is for the adjuster to twist your words. Answer their questions truthfully, but don’t embellish or go into more detail than necessary.

4. Don’t Admit Fault

After a crash, it’s easy to say things that might imply you were at fault, especially if you’re confused or finding it hard to express yourself. If that’s the case, it’s best to wait until you’re feeling better before talking to an insurance adjuster. And of course, don’t admit fault for an accident you didn’t cause.

5. Track Your Expenses

Keep a record of all your expenses related to the accident, like medical bills, bike repairs, and lost wages. Provide copies of these documents to the insurance adjuster when they ask for them. These bills will need to be paid, either by you or the person who caused the accident, so make sure they’re part of any settlement.

6. Don’t Sign Anything Without Legal Advice

Do not agree to any settlement or sign any documents or agreements without talking to a lawyer first. Insurance adjusters might try to get you to sign away your right to sue or accept a settlement offer that’s less than you deserve.

Now, let’s dive a bit deeper into the things you need to know.


Understanding Insurance Policies: Terms to Know

Watercolor Splash image of a greedy insurance adjuster sitting in piles of cash

Navigating the world of insurance policies can be tricky, especially when you’re dealing with the aftermath of a motorcycle accident. Insurance companies use lingo every day that the average driver may not fully understand. They can (and often do) use this to their advantage, so let’s level the playing field.

Here’s a quick rundown of some key terms you’re sure to hear and what they really mean:

  • Actual Cash Value (ACV): This is the value of your property, based on the current cost to replace it minus depreciation. In the case of a total loss, the insurance company might pay out the ACV of your motorcycle.
  • Adjuster: An insurance adjuster is a representative of the insurance company who investigates and evaluates insurance claims to determine the extent of the insurance company’s liability.
  • Claim: A request made by the insured to the insurance company to cover an incurred loss. In the context of a motorcycle accident, this could be for damages to the motorcycle, medical expenses, or other costs related to the accident.
  • Coverage: The extent of protection provided by an insurance policy. Coverage can vary greatly from one policy to another, and it’s important to understand exactly what your policy covers.
  • Coverage Limits: This is the maximum amount your insurance company will pay for a covered loss.
  • Deductible: This is the amount you’ll need to pay out of pocket before your insurance coverage kicks in.
  • Exclusion: Certain conditions or circumstances for which the insurance company will not provide coverage. Exclusions are detailed in the insurance policy, and it’s important to be aware of them.
  • Liability: This refers to the legal responsibility for one’s actions or omissions. In an insurance context, liability insurance covers the policyholder’s legal liability in the event of damage or injury to another party.
  • Policyholder: The individual or entity who owns the insurance policy. This is the person who holds the contract with the insurance company and pays the premiums.
  • Premium: The amount of money that an individual or business pays for an insurance policy.
  • Replacement Cost: Unlike ACV, replacement cost coverage will pay the cost to repair or replace the damaged property with materials of similar kind and quality, without any deduction for depreciation.
  • Subrogation: This is a term often used in the insurance industry to refer to the right of the insurance company to recover the amount it has paid for a loss from the party that caused the loss.
  • Umbrella Coverage: This is a type of insurance coverage that goes beyond the limits of regular insurance policies, such as homeowners or auto insurance. It provides an additional layer of security to those who are at risk for being sued for damages to other people’s property or injuries caused to others in an accident. It also protects against libel, vandalism, slander, and invasion of privacy.
  • Underinsured/Uninsured Motorist Coverage: This type of insurance coverage protects you if you’re involved in an accident with a motorist who does not have sufficient insurance coverage or no insurance at all.

Understanding these terms can help you know what to expect when dealing with insurance companies after an accident.


Documenting the Accident: A Step-by-Step Guide

A step-by-step infographic with information on maximizing a personal injury claim after an accident.

Proper documentation can make a world of difference when it comes to filing an insurance claim. Here’s what you need to do:

Step 1: Call the Police

Image of police at an accident scene with text: "Step 1 Call the cops"

The police are a vital part of the process as they gather information and help generate a timeline of events. Also, as soon as you can, write down everything you remember about the accident. This can be crucial evidence if there’s a dispute about what happened.

Step 2: Take Photos 

Image of a man taking pictures with his phone at the scene of an accident with text: "Step 2 take pics"

Capture images (or video) of the accident scene, your motorcycle, and any injuries you sustained.

Step 3: Gather Information and Medical Records

An infographic showing the sources of medical records

Collect the other party’s contact and insurance information, and note down the details of the accident while they’re still fresh in your mind. Then in the following days, weeks, and months, keep track of (document) every doctor’s visit, physical therapy appointment, testing, or other medically related activity.

The Importance of Immediate Medical Attention

image of a motorcyclist rubbing his neck showing the strain of rider fatigue

Photo Credits – Physio Inq Sutherland

Even if you feel fine after an accident, it’s crucial to seek medical attention immediately. Not only is this important for your health, but it also establishes a record of your injuries, which can be vital when you’re filing an insurance claim or a personal injury lawsuit.


Why You Should Consider Hiring a Lawyer

A watercolor splash painting of a motorcycle crash with mostly grayscale capturing the somber mood, but red around the motorcycle crash site indicating the physical and mental toll of the crash

Dealing with insurance adjusters can be daunting, especially when you’re recovering from an accident. A lawyer can negotiate on your behalf, ensuring that you’re treated fairly and that you get the compensation you deserve. They can handle the paperwork, deal with the insurance companies, and let you focus on your recovery.


What’s next?

If you’re unsure about how to handle the insurance adjuster or feel you’re not being treated fairly, consider hiring an attorney. An attorney can negotiate on your behalf and help you get the compensation you deserve. 

Don’t navigate this process alone. If you’re dealing with an insurance claim after a motorcycle accident, contact The Biker Lawyers for a free, no-obligation case evaluation. We’re here to help you ride through this tough time. Call today or click here to get started.

Watercolor splash painting of a motorcycle on a highway with the biker lawyers logo and text.

Ride safe, and remember, we’re here for you.

How to Avoid Crashing a Motorcycle

How to Avoid Crashing a Motorcycle

Top 10 Rules of the Road: Avoiding Motorcycle Crashes Like a Pro

On two wheels, safety isn’t just important, it’s everything. For that very reason, we’ve crafted a list of the top 10 lifesaving rules to keep you upright on your ride. These aren’t rocket science but following them religiously can significantly trim down the chances of a nasty surprise. This is how to avoid crashing a motorcycle.

Here’s a quick rundown of the tips. Once you check it out, keep scrolling for a bit more about our logic for each.

1. The Cardinal Rule: Always Be on Alert

Image from the perspective of a motorcyclist demonstrating alert perceptions while riding

Think every driver out there is out to get you. Assume that they’re going to make a wrong move that could put you in harm’s way. That guy cruising towards the intersection? Expect a sudden left turn. That woman at the crossroads? Be ready for her to bolt just as you get there. Speaking of Intersections…

Image of motorcyclists demonstrating how to safely cross an intersection

2. Beware the Intersection

Intersections are like the Wild West of roads. They’re unpredictable. Even if you don’t see any cars, slow down. Remember, preparedness is key, and it’s easier to respond to surprises when you’re not blazing through like a comet.

Image of a frightened driver with a focus on his eyes.

3. Don’t Trust the Eyes

It might look like a driver has locked eyes with you, but here’s the truth: they’re often looking right past you. You’re on two wheels, they’re scanning for four. You’re practically invisible to them.

Image of a car turning in an intersection.

4. Trust the Wheels

The wheels, though, they don’t lie. A driver’s eyes might deceive you, but the wheels give it away. If they twitch, you twitch and prepare for them to burst into your path.

Image of a motorcyclist surrounded by cars with the potential to turn into a "lethal-Left" situation

5. Prepare for the Lethal Left

Always assume the oncoming car is going to make a sudden left turn right in front of you. Ease off the gas, hover over the brakes, and be ready for some fast action.

Image of a motorcycle that has crashed.

6. Find a Shield

Whenever possible, go through intersections with another vehicle beside you. It’s not foolproof, but if someone’s gonna run a red light, better they hit your metal buddy than you.

Close-up image of tire tread

7. Check Your Ride

Give your tires a once-over before you roll out. Badly inflated tires can cause serious trouble at high speed, and you don’t want a blowout on the open road.

Image of several bikers riding motorcycles- each controlling the space around them

8. Control Your Space

If someone’s tailgating you, wave them back. If they don’t take the hint, pull over and let them speed away. They’re a hazard you don’t need.

Image of a person on a motorcycle at an intersection looking at the camera as if it were another motorist

9. Create Your Buffer

If a car passes you and pulls in too close, ease back and re-establish your safety zone. You need space to react if something suddenly appears in your path.

Image of Pete Leehey and Dan Matzdorff demonstrating proper distancing while riding a motorcycle

10. Keep Your Distance

Don’t tailgate. Keep a solid three-second safety buffer between you and the traffic ahead. You want space to react, not a windshield for a face mask.

Wrap Up

These are the rules of the road, the biker’s bible for staying safe out there. But hey, we’re all human, and stuff happens. If you ever find yourself in a scrape, get medical help pronto, and once that’s taken care of, reach out to pro motorcycle accident attorneys like Pete Leehey and Dan Matzdorff. They’ve been there, done that, and can guide you on what to do next.Call to action Image- A motorcycle riding down a highway with text encouraging the viewer to call The Biker Lawyers for a free consultation

Most Common Causes of Motorcycle Accidents in Iowa

Most Common Causes of Motorcycle Accidents in Iowa

Editor’s Note: The following article about the most common causes of motorcycle accidents in Iowa is the first in a series of Guest posts provided by our friends at vikingbags.com

Listen to this article:

Table of Contents

  1. Motorcycle Accidents Statistics at Iowa
  2. Most Common Causes of Motorcycle Accidents in Iowa

2.1 Speeding

2.2 Riding while Impaired

2.3 No Helmet Law

2.4 Distracted Car Drivers

2.5 Lost Control

2.6 Angled Collisions

  1. Conclusion

To help prevent motorcycle accidents, their common causes must be identified. For those who haven’t been here, Iowa is a beautiful U.S. state located between the Mississippi and Missouri rivers, well-known for its large cornfields and landscapes.

Due to such scenic views and attractive spots, Iowa has become an attractive place for motorcyclists. However, riding a motorcycle in Iowa is riskier for several reasons. Read this article to learn the most common causes of motorcycle accidents in Iowa.

1.    Motorcycle Accidents Statistics at Iowa

In a study conducted by the Institute of Transportation (InTrans) of Iowa State University, approximately 302 riders died during 2016-2021 due to being involved in motorcycle accidents in Iowa.

Iowa roads require constant diligence to safety for motorcycle riders as the number of motorcycle accidents has reached more than 5,700 during this period. Almost 1,305 riders during 2016-2021 suffered from serious injuries.

2.    Most Common Causes of Motorcycle Accidents in Iowa

2.1 Speeding

Statistics: As per the statistics presented by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA) Fatality and Injury Reporting System Tool (FIRST), 25.9% of fatal motorcycle accidents that occurred during 2015-2019 were due to speeding.

Modern motorcycles can produce impressive horsepower and torque due to being fitted with powerful engines. Many young riders are attracted to sport bikes and aggressive riding, resulting in more motorcycle crashes and deaths. Speeding becomes more dangerous when:

  • It is raining
  • There is less visibility due to fog
  • There are sharp turns on the road
  • There is heavy traffic

2.2 Riding while Impaired

Statistics: Most riders involved in motorcycle accidents were found to have more than the permissible amount of Alcohol Concentration in their blood (BAC > 0.08%).

In Iowa, 6% of all the fatal motorcycle crashes that happened between 2015-2019 occurred due to riding under the influence as reported by the NHTSA.

You are at a greater risk of being involved in an accident if you are impaired. Alcohol and drug use among motorcycle riders and car drivers have been a major issue in Iowa and all over the U.S. When you are under the influence, it can make you lose your senses, judgment, decision-making ability, muscle coordination, and control of your motorcycle. Impaired riders have a much slower response to danger as compared to sober riders.

“Wear all safety things, don’t outride my abilities, and never drink and ride!” -Luther Berge, Three Rules of the Road for Motorcycle Riders

2.3 No Helmet Law

Close up image of a motorcycle helmet on the ground

This may not be a cause of crashes, but it could easily be argued that wearing a helmet reduces the risk of head injury in a motorcycle crash. That said, Iowa is one of the few U.S. states that does not have a helmet law. In Iowa, you are not legally required to wear a helmet and there is no fine imposed on riders not wearing helmets while riding. However, it is encouraged to wear a helmet to be safe.

In Iowa, it is the rider’s choice to wear protective gear and eye protection. Most fatalities in motorcycle accidents are caused due to head injuries. Wearing a DOT-approved helmet and appropriate riding gear can save you from severe injuries. Even a “minor” head impact during a motorcycle crash can cause severe injury or death.

2.4 Distracted Car Drivers

a woman in a yellow shirt texting while driving

Motorcycles are smaller than cars and are less visible to car drivers on the road, especially when riding in the dark. The possibility of a car driver hitting a motorcycle increases when he/she is distracted.

The most common distraction which results in most road accidents is the mobile phone. In more than 10% of fatal road accidents in the U.S., the driver was reported using a cell phone while driving. The drivers may be inclined to reply to a text message, receive a phone call from work, play music, and eat food while driving.

Statistics: According to the NHTSA, almost 70% of motorcycle accidents in the U.S. occur due to drivers not paying attention to driving carefully and failing to watch out for motorcyclists on the road.

If you are involved in a motorcycle or car accident and have suffered injuries due to another rider’s fault, you can seek assistance from The Biker Lawyers to find justice and cover your medical bills and property losses.

2.5 Lost Control

Statistics: According to the NHTSA, approximately 18% of deaths in motorcycle accidents happened due to riders losing control of their motorcycles. More than 29% of motorcycle crashes in Iowa between 2015-2019 involved riders that lost control of their motorcycles.

There are several reasons why a motorcycle loses control during the ride. It can be due to bad weather, wet road conditions, obstacles, animals, damaged roads, speeding, distraction, swerving, speed wobbles, loss of traction, and faulty motorcycle parts and products. If you are a beginner rider, you should only ride beginner motorcycles. Riding sport bikes, performance cruisers, and naked bikes require expert-level handling and maneuvering skills to ensure stability.

2.6 Angled Collisions

Image of a motorcycle after being T-boned by a car

Angled collisions, also known as T-bone collisions, are those in which two vehicles collide with each other at an angle of 90°. T-bone collisions usually occur when drivers do not follow traffic rules, break signals, and change their lanes without indicating the other vehicles on the road.

Statistics: Accidents involving two or more vehicles resulted in 45.2% of fatalities in motorcycle accidents between 2015-2019 in the U.S. and the most common of these are angled collisions. NHTSA also found that 56.1% of fatal motorcycle accidents involved angled collisions.

3.    Conclusion

There are several reasons why the number of fatalities in motorcycle accidents has been increasing in Iowa over the years. If you want to be safe while riding a motorcycle, make sure to wear a helmet and appropriate riding gear. Avoid speeding and riding under the influence of alcohol and drugs as it can be life-threatening.

If you are a beginner and learning how to ride a motorcycle, do not take your motorcycle out on busy roads. Also, to be safe on the road, do not ride a motorcycle that you cannot handle. You can install a motorcycle trunk bag and saddlebags available at Viking Bags to carry useful stuff such as a first-aid kit, helmet, gloves, and white visors to ride safely in the dark.


If you or someone you know has been injured in an accident, click here to contact The Biker Lawyers, or call (877) 209-9452 for a free case evaluation.

Injured in a Motor Vehicle Accident? Here’s What You Need to Know

Injured in a Motor Vehicle Accident? Here’s What You Need to Know

Injured in a Motor Vehicle Accident? Here’s What You Need to Know

Posted on March 28, 2023 at 4:10 PM by The Biker Lawyers

 

 

 

Have you been injured in a motor vehicle accident in the Midwest? Dealing with the aftermath of a personal injury can be overwhelming, and it’s important to understand your legal rights and options.

In this comprehensive guide, we’ll cover everything you need to know about personal injury law, financial compensation, and finding the right attorney.

With over 39 years of experience, The Biker Lawyers are here to help you navigate the legal process and get the compensation you deserve.

Whether you’re a biker or a driver, we’ll show you how to protect your rights and make informed decisions. Don’t wait – read on to learn more.

What is Financial Compensation?

When someone is injured or suffers damages as a result of another person’s negligence or intentional act, they may be entitled to financial compensation.

Financial compensation is a legal remedy that is designed to compensate the injured party for the harm they have suffered.

In the context of personal injury law, financial compensation may take many forms, such as medical expenses, lost wages, pain and suffering, emotional distress, and property damage. The purpose of financial compensation is to restore the injured party to the position they were in prior to the injury or damages.

To receive financial compensation, the injured party must prove that the other party was at fault for the injury or damages. This can be a complex process, and it’s important to work with an experienced personal injury attorney to ensure that you receive the full compensation that you are entitled to.

If someone else crashes my vehicle and gets hurt, am I liable?

So you loaned your car to a buddy and they were involved in a crash. If someone else crashes your vehicle and gets hurt, you may be held liable if it can be shown that the accident was caused by your negligence or that of your agent (for example, somebody that drove your car with your consent- also known as a consent driver).

As with most things, it all comes down to fault. If the accident was caused by the other driver’s negligence, however, you may not be held liable for the other driver’s injuries. In this case, the other driver would need to pursue compensation from their own insurance company or file a lawsuit against the at-fault driver.

It’s important to note that liability laws vary by state, so it’s important to work with a personal injury attorney familiar with the laws in your state to understand your legal rights and obligations.

What happens if I’m hurt driving someone else’s vehicle?

If you are hurt while driving someone else’s vehicle, you may be entitled to financial compensation. The at-fault driver’s insurance company would be responsible for paying your damages, including medical expenses, lost wages, and pain and suffering.

It’s important to note that liability laws vary by state, and some states have “no-fault” insurance laws, which require drivers to seek compensation from their own insurance companies first, regardless of who was at fault for the accident.

To ensure that you receive the full compensation you are entitled to, it’s important to work with an experienced personal injury attorney who can help you navigate the legal process and protect your legal rights.

Where do I find a personal injury attorney?

There are several ways to find a personal injury attorney, including:

  • Referrals from friends, family, or colleagues- or even attorneys you know who don’t practice in the area you need help with
  • Online search engines and directories, such as Avvo or The National Trial Lawyers
  • State or local bar associations
  • Legal aid organizations

When choosing a personal injury attorney, it’s important to consider their experience, reputation, and track record of success. You should also feel comfortable with the attorney and confident in their ability to handle your case.

What does a motorcycle or car accident lawyer do?

A motorcycle or car accident lawyer is a personal injury attorney who specializes in representing clients who have been injured in motor vehicle accidents. They typically handle cases involving car accidents, truck accidents, motorcycle accidents, and pedestrian accidents.

 

The specific duties of a motorcycle or car accident lawyer may include:

Investigating the accident

The lawyer will investigate the accident to determine who was at fault and to gather evidence to support the client’s case.

Evaluating damages

The lawyer will evaluate the client’s damages, including medical expenses, lost wages, and pain and suffering, to determine the appropriate amount of compensation to seek.

Negotiating with insurance companies

The lawyer will negotiate with the insurance company to reach a settlement that provides fair compensation to their client.

Representing the client in court

If a settlement cannot be reached, the lawyer will represent the client in court to seek a favorable judgment.

A motorcycle or car accident lawyer can help clients navigate the complex legal process and protect their legal rights.

How do I know which personal injury attorney to hire?

There are a lot of lawyers out there. You may not be sure who to trust. Choosing the right personal injury attorney can be a difficult task, especially if you’re not sure who to trust.

Here are a few tips to help you find a trustworthy personal injury attorney:

  1. Look for experience: Choose an attorney who has experience handling cases similar to yours.
  2. Check their reputation: Look for reviews and testimonials from previous clients to get a sense of their reputation.
  3. Consider their track record: Choose an attorney with a track record of success in handling personal injury cases.
  4. Schedule a consultation: Schedule a consultation with the attorney to discuss your case and to get a sense of their communication style and approach to representing clients.

When choosing a personal injury attorney, it’s important to take the time to research potential attorneys, ask questions during the consultation, and choose an attorney with experience and a track record of success in handling cases similar to yours.

My case is ongoing but the bills are too much and I can’t wait. I’m thinking about filing for bankruptcy. Do I need to let my PI attorney know?

Absolutely. If you’re thinking about filing for bankruptcy while your personal injury case is ongoing, it’s important to let your attorney know. Filing for bankruptcy can have a significant impact on your personal injury case, and your attorney will need to take this into account when negotiating with the insurance company or representing you in court.

Your attorney can work with you to understand the impact of bankruptcy on your personal injury case and to help you make informed decisions about your legal options.

I’ve been with my insurance company for years. Shouldn’t I trust them to do right by me?

While you may have a long-standing relationship with your insurance company, it’s important to remember that their primary goal is to protect their bottom line. This means that they may not always have your best interests in mind. Having a personal injury lawyer on your side means being able to stand toe-to-toe with the insurance company and making sure your best interests are represented.

Conclusion

If you have been injured in a motor vehicle accident, it’s important to understand your legal rights and to seek the guidance of an experienced personal injury attorney. A personal injury attorney can help you navigate the complex legal process, protect your legal rights, and seek fair compensation for your injuries.

If you have been injured in a motor vehicle accident in Iowa or Minnesota, please don’t hesitate to contact us for a free consultation. We have over 39 years of experience fighting for the rights of our clients, and we’re here to help you navigate the legal process and seek the compensation you deserve. Contact The Biker Lawyers for a free consultation today.

 

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