Posted on January 24, 2023 at 7:00 PM by The Biker Lawyers

Image of two motorcycles outside of a storage unit at night with text.

How long can you keep a motorcycle outside without covering it up or wrapping it in blankets?

A motorcycle is an investment. How long it can be left outside unprotected from the elements really depends on where you live.

It's generally not recommended to keep a motorcycle outside for extended periods of time without covering it up or providing some form of protection. The elements, such as sun, rain, and snow, can cause damage to the paint, chrome, and other parts of the motorcycle. Even in the summer, leaving your bike outside for extended periods of time without covering it (we're talking months on end without riding) is generally not a good idea. UV rays from the sun can cause the paint to fade and crack, while rain and snow can cause rust and corrosion.

But again, it depends on where you live. The extent and type of damage a motorcycle can receive from the weather can include factors like climate, the materials of the motorcycle, and (if you do choose to cover your bike,) the level of protection provided by the motorcycle cover or blanket.

As a general rule, it's best to minimize the time a motorcycle is left outside, particularly if the weather is harsh, and cover it with a good quality motorcycle cover or use a durable tarp, or wrap it in a blanket to protect it from the elements.

Regular cleaning and maintenance of the motorcycle will also help to minimize the damage caused by the elements. This includes washing the motorcycle, waxing the paint, and lubricating the moving parts.
It's also important to pay attention to the storage space, if you are storing the motorcycle in a garage or a shed, it's important to make sure it's dry and well-ventilated. 

If you're taking your motorcycle out for the first ride of the season, this might help...

Click below for 3 motorcycle prep tips for a new season of riding

Image of motorcycle memes suggesting the mental health benefits of riding a motorcycle.

"The Dipshit Tax"

Typically, if you’re putting your bike away for the winter, it’s smart to use a trickle-charger or you may end up paying (what we riders like to call) “The Dipshit Tax.” In other words, you’ll end up having to buy a new battery.

A trickle charger, also known as a "maintainer" or "float charger," is a type of battery charger that is used to keep a motorcycle battery at a full charge without overcharging it. It is designed to supply a small amount of current, typically around 2-4 amps, to a battery that is already fully charged. The charger is connected to the battery for an extended period of time, and it maintains the battery's charge level, preventing it from discharging completely.

Trickle chargers are particularly helpful for motorcycles that are not ridden frequently. A motorcycle battery can lose its charge over time, even when not in use, due to the natural self-discharge of the battery. A trickle charger can keep the battery at a full charge and ready for use, even if the motorcycle is not ridden for several weeks or months.

Trickle chargers are also useful for motorcycles that are stored for long periods, such as during the off-season or for extended vacations. They can help to prolong the life of the battery by preventing it from being overcharged or drained completely.

Trickle chargers are also designed with safety features, such as overcharge protection and short-circuit protection, to prevent damage to the battery and the charger itself.

If you do end up having to pay The Dip Sh*t Tax, don't worry, we've all been there. Here's something that can help: 

Image of a tattooed man's arms changing a motorcycle battery with text.


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