2023 Guide to Gun Laws in Iowa: What You Need to Know

2023 Guide to Gun Laws in Iowa: What You Need to Know

Gun Laws in Iowa: What You Need to Know

Posted on March 20, 2023 at 7:00 PM by The Biker Lawyers

Understanding Your Rights and Restrictions

The Midwest is a great place to explore, especially if you love to ride a motorcycle. However, if you are planning to carry a gun across state lines, it is important to know the laws of the states you will be traveling through. In this blog post, we will cover some of the gun laws in the Midwest and provide helpful tips for anyone looking to carry a gun across state lines.

The History of Gun Laws in Iowa

In the state of Iowa, the laws regarding carrying a gun have changed over the years. At one time, Iowa had what is known as a “may issue” gun permitting system, meaning that a person could apply to the sheriff, and the sheriff could apply his or her discretion and decide whether to issue a permit. A few years ago, the law changed from a “may issue” system to a “shall issue” system, meaning that the sheriff is required to issue a permit as long as there is not a significant problem that suggests the person should not have a gun.

Iowa’s Modern-day Constitutional Carry Gun Law

In the last couple of years, the legislature in Iowa did away with the need for anyone to have a permit to carry a gun. As long as the person is an adult citizen that is not otherwise disqualified from carrying a gun, they can legally carry a gun without a permit. So does this mean the Iowa Concealed Carry Permit is obsolete? Not really…

Know Before You Go

When it comes to carrying a gun across state lines, it is important to know the laws of the states you will be traveling through. There are states that recognize some permits, but not all. For example, Iowa permits are not recognized in Minnesota.

Carrying a Gun in Public

It’s also important to know what areas you can and cannot carry a gun in. For example, you cannot carry a gun on school grounds. You cannot open carry a gun into the State House (oddly enough it’s legal if the gun is concealed). While you can carry your gun in places that serve alcohol, it is not wise to do so if you are going to drink. Penalties are severe if you are found to be carrying a gun while legally under the influence.

In Iowa, signs on a business stating guns are not allowed have no legal effect. If the proprietor sees that you have a gun and asks you to leave, however, you must do so.

If You Get Pulled Over With a Gun

If you are pulled over while carrying a gun in the Midwest, it is important to know the laws of each state. In the state of Iowa, there is no law that states you have to volunteer and tell the cop you are carrying, nor is there a law that states you have to answer the officer if they ask. However, if the officer does ask if you have a permit, you must answer truthfully and show them your permit.

In states like Nebraska, the law states that you must tell the officer immediately if you are carrying a gun, while in other states like Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, and Missouri, you must answer truthfully if the officer asks if you have a gun.

Where to Find More Information

If you want more information on gun laws in the Midwest, it is important to visit a website like usconcealedcarry.com. This website provides a rundown of the different state laws, which states recognize which permits, and which states require you to tell the officer right away that you are carrying a firearm.

It is also important to remember that if you are traveling across state lines, you should always have your permit with you. If you have any additional questions, it is best to contact an experienced lawyer who can help.

We hope this blog post has provided you with helpful information on gun laws in the Midwest. Before you go on your next adventure, make sure you research the laws of the states you will be traveling through.

If you are ever injured in a crash, contact the Biker Lawyers for your free consultation.

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Do Compensators Help Accuracy?

Do Compensators Help Accuracy?

Firearm FAQ: Do Compensators Help Accuracy?

 

Posted on October 27, 2022 at 12:52 PM by The Biker Lawyers

It all started with a picture of a customized P-80

I got a message from Rick, who is a member of my Midwest Shooting leagues team.  He was at the range experimenting with a compensator and sent me a picture of his custom race gun, a P-80 with an attached thing on the end of the barrel that I had never seen before (pictured).

 

Less recoil = more accuracy?

I had no idea what it was.  He explained it was a compensator that screws into the barrel of his 9mm and controls recoil which should make him shoot more accurately.

 

 

 

So, I went to the old Google to research more about this magical attachment.

“Compensators dramatically reduces muzzle rise and sensed recoil”

Apparently, this contraption allows for wicked-fast target re-acquisition because it helps control recoil. Controlled Recoil on a firearm makes you more accurate and helps for faster target acquisition because, in theory, your muzzle doesn’t move as far off target. At least, that’s what I got from my “research.”

Getting a professional education on compensation

So, I brought Rick and Jayden from Midwest Shooting into the classroom to get a look and deeper education on compensators.  It turns out there are at least two different types of compensators. There are outboard designs that one can screw into threaded barrels or guns with compensators built-in to the barrel design of the gun (see picture above).

It was explained to me that the compensators allow for gasses to be released from holes in the compensator which slightly forces the muzzle of the gun downward and, as a result, lessens the recoil.

“Every action has an equal and opposite reaction.” – Jayden, Midwest Shooting

Obviously, Jayden gave me a fairly good education on why compensators help control recoil and Rick let us know how he did while on Midwest’s range practicing with the compensator.

Rick sent me a picture of his target, and, to my still relatively untrained eye, it looked fantastic… but it turns out, that was from his shots WITHOUT the compensator.

So the verdict: to each their own.

What do you think? Have you ever used a compensator? Does it do all the things the Almighty Google claims or is it just a cool way to customize your piece?


About Russ: The biker community’s Ambassador of Ammo

Known as a professional Radio Gypsy, Russ is the voice of “crazy stories and bad behavior” on Rock 108 every weekday from 10 AM – 2 PM (CST). After a shooting expedition with friends, Russ found a new passion for firearms and is now searching to find the perfect fit to match his needs. Join him as he tests and reviews various guns and targets, learns gun safety, and occasionally blows stuff up every week right here!

Make sure to subscribe to this blog for email updates when Russ posts a new experience!


This blog is brought to you by

The Biker Lawyers, PC Personal Injury Lawfirm. Injured?

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Platform Defining Personal Protection

Platform Defining Personal Protection

Platform Defining Personal Protection

Posted on October 20, 2022 at 6:00 AM by The Biker Lawyers

Three Little Pieces

Three little pieces let me in!!! These three pieces will huff without the puff and blow your target away!

The three guns we’re showing you in this blog are both upgrades and platform-defining weapons.

This week we’re going to demo three special weapons.  We can’t bring them to the range because there is only one of each in stock- these are hard-to-find, high-demand weapons.

In the forthcoming video, Jayden from Midwest Shooting in Hiawatha is back to show us these very special pieces.

The Legendary Colt Python Revolver

The legendary Colt Python revolver six-shooter.  You will see in the video (I promise it’ll be worth the wait…) the quality of this gun from the stainless finish, the heavy, weighted steel frame, the vented barrel, and the beautiful wood finish on the grip which looks hand-made of incredibly high-quality materials—and that also pretty much describes the entire weapon.

The Sig Saur P-226 X-5

The Sig Sauer P-226 X-5 .9mm. As a 226, it will feel familiar but even better because of all the little extras that go into this gun.

“The extra weighting in the handle for recoil management, the extended mag capacity, and the stainless finish all combine to make this a jaw-dropping expression of the 226 that makes it a must-have for any enthusiast.” 

-Russ, The Biker’s Ambassador of Ammo

FN SCAR 17-S

Built on a military platform the FN SCAR 17-S, is an incredible long gun. This is a 762×51 with a multi-colored desert camo body.  Watch the video for Jayden’s complete walk-thru of all the features of this high-quality long gun.

As we all know, I haven’t handled a lot of guns and what I have are all the standard big-sellers.  While I have handled and shot rifles, revolvers, and 9mm guns the quality and craftsmanship of the three guns we’re demoing in the video was apparent as soon as I picked each one up; I was amazed and hope it carries through the screen.

About Russ: The biker community’s Ambassador of Ammo

Known as a professional Radio Gypsy, Russ is the voice of “crazy stories and bad behavior” on Rock 108 every weekday from 10 AM – 2 PM (CST). After a shooting expedition with friends, Russ found a new passion for firearms and is now searching to find the perfect fit to match his needs. Join him as he tests and reviews various guns and targets, learns gun safety, and occasionally blows stuff up every week right here!

Make sure to subscribe to this blog for email updates when Russ posts a new experience!

Known as a professional Radio Gypsy, Russ is the voice of “crazy stories and bad behavior” on Rock 108 every weekday from 10 AM – 2 PM (CST). After a shooting expedition with friends, Russ found a new passion for firearms and is now searching to find the perfect fit to match his needs. Join him as he tests and reviews various guns and targets, learns gun safety, and occasionally blows stuff up every week right here!

Make sure to subscribe to this blog for email updates when Russ posts a new experience!

This blog is brought to you by

The Biker Lawyers, PC Personal Injury Lawfirm. Injured?

15 + 2 =

The Price of Personal Protection: Is Cheaper Worth it?

The Price of Personal Protection: Is Cheaper Worth it?

The Price of Personal Protection: Is Cheaper Worth it?

Posted on October 12, 2022 at 9:00 AM by The Biker Lawyers

How much should you spend when purchasing a pistol?

Does pistol price matter?  That’s the question we set out to answer this week.  We’re pitting one of the cheapest pistols on the market, the Hi-Point 9mm vs a more expensive top-shelf Sig Sauer p-225.  Is there a huge difference in accuracy, power, and overall quality between the high-end and the Hi-point?

SHOOTOUT: $1400 9mm Sig P226 vs 9mm Hi-Point $179.00

As a novice shooter, I wasn’t sure what to consider when looking at the overall quality comparing guns. So, I recruited the help of Levi, an experienced gun owner, marksman and happy/knowledgeable salesperson at Midwest Shooting inc.  He walked me thru some of the things to be aware of.

 

What to consider when evaluating a firearm

When comparing the 9mm Sig P226 and the 9mm Hi-Point, we examined five points: materials, fit/finish, ease of disassembly, trigger feel, and accuracy.

  1. Materials- one is very durable with a steel frame while the other is cast iron which can crack easily.
  2. Fit and finish. One felt tight and very well crafted and was comfortable to hold.  The other was loose, rattled and felt “blocky” and angular in my hands
  3. Ease of disassembly for cleaning and repairs.
  4. Trigger feel.  Have to go to the range to find out this parameter.
  5. Accuracy — again, we’ll find out on the range.

After a brief introductionAfter a brief introduction to how to operate each pistol, we went to the range.  We both took 5 shots at close range with each gun and compared the results. to how to operate each pistol, we went to the range.  We both took 5 shots at close range with each gun and compared the results.

Testing on the shooting range

I shot first and took the 226 (the top-of-the-line pistol) in hand.  Overall, it felt great.  I fired single action with the hammer cocked in position.  Test one was Inconclusive.  This was a new gun in the hands of a novice shooter and I put two dead center and scattered three shots.

Next, I picked up the Hi-Point (the more “affordable” gun).  Its angular frame had a weird feel to me. As I moved the gun in my hands it rattled and shook with audible noises.  The trigger felt blade-thin and I had trouble getting it set into the crook of my thumb.  My shots surprisingly were slightly more accurate though.  There are lots of variables to take into account so it’s difficult to say the gun had anything to do with accuracy because I just haven’t sent enough rounds downrange to be all that consistent.

Levi, on the other hand, will be a much better judge of accuracy- or will he?

You’ll have to watch the video to judge for yourself.  Levi was a much more accurate shooter putting all his shots from both guns in the center rings.  The ones furthest from the center and that landed in the pink, were all shot with the Hi-Point.

Conclusion

My conclusion:  For competitive shooting and for a gun that will last a lifetime you will probably want to pay to play and buy a reliable name-brand weapon that is very reasonably priced around $500 and up.  If you’re looking for personal protection from a gun you plan on hardly ever using, the highpoint offers about the same protection at close range as the more expensive choices and you can throw it in the fish tank when it eventually breaks.

As usual, I’d be interested in hearing you comments which you can post below. Or email me russ@rock108.com

About Russ: The biker community’s Ambassador of Ammo

Known as a professional Radio Gypsy, Russ is the voice of “crazy stories and bad behavior” on Rock 108 every weekday from 10 AM – 2 PM (CST). After a shooting expedition with friends, Russ found a new passion for firearms and is now searching to find the perfect fit to match his needs. Join him as he tests and reviews various guns and targets, learns gun safety, and occasionally blows stuff up every week right here!

Make sure to subscribe to this blog for email updates when Russ posts a new experience!

This blog is brought to you by

The Biker Lawyers, PC Personal Injury Lawfirm. Injured?

5 + 5 =

The Gunner Games: The Truth about Shooting Leagues

The Gunner Games: The Truth about Shooting Leagues

The Gunner Games: The Truth about Shooting Leagues

Posted on October 5, 2022 at 11:53 AM by The Biker Lawyers

What are Shooting Leagues?

Being new to shooting and guns in general I am looking for a way to improve my skills.

My options are to just go to the range as much as possible and keep practicing the skills I’ve learned so far. But, I tend to learn better when I’m being challenged and having fun; neither of those takes place by myself on the range.

So, I decided to join a shooting league. Look, I’m not kidding myself. For me, it’s not about being competitive. That’s a good thing too because league shooting has some fairly expert teams. But I had a way to make it competitive and fun.

First things first – I had to decide what gun I’m going to take into my weekly league battle. I’ve mostly shot 9mm Glocks. But when trying out different pieces specifically with competition in mind, I settled on the .9mm 1911 Kimber. It fits my hand really nicely and I like the thumb grip safety because it reminds me to keep the proper grip or the thing just won’t fire.

The League Teams

Boston Mike, one of the other Jocks from Rock 108, thought it might be fun to join the league and have a friendly competition with me. We recruited teams on our Facebook pages. We actually ended up with three teams.  Mike’s team, my team, and a team of female shooters who are also listeners.

Mike’s Team: The M&M’s  Military Misfits.

Russ’ Team:  The Bang Gang

The Women’s Team:  The Sex Pistols

Pulling the Strings to find out how Shooting Leagues work…

Each week consists of five strings, which change every week but look something like this:

String One: 12 Shots two-handed with mandatory reload.  The reload must have at least one shot. 15 seconds

String Two: 12 shots one-handed with mandatory reload. The reload must have at least one shot. 30 seconds

String 3: 6 Shots, one-handed, 10 seconds — the weak hand.  This one was very difficult.

String 4:  12 shots Light dimmed, 12 shots 10 seconds.

String 5: 6 Shots at a hostage target (explained in the video)

Bonus String: 2 shots at a high point but very small targets.

To see exactly what we did our first week, you can watch the video which has a much better explanation from Dave who calls the event every week.

The First Week’s Results

The wrap-up after week one.  I had learned to shoot fairly well while alone with no distractions on the range.

But 19 other people in the room, skills tests, and a caller who resembles a Drill Sergent, and the nerves, uncertainty, and embarrassment of shooting next to people who are all much better than me really amps things up which in the long run will all conspire to make me a better shooter– RIGHT?  Time will tell.

About Russ: The biker community’s Ambassador of Ammo

Known as a professional Radio Gypsy, Russ is the voice of “crazy stories and bad behavior” on Rock 108 every weekday from 10 AM – 2 PM (CST). After a shooting expedition with friends, Russ found a new passion for firearms and is now searching to find the perfect fit to match his needs. Join him as he tests and reviews various guns and targets, learns gun safety, and occasionally blows stuff up every week right here!

Make sure to subscribe to this blog for email updates when Russ posts a new experience!

This blog is brought to you by

The Biker Lawyers, PC Personal Injury Lawfirm. Injured?

7 + 4 =

Custom Barrel Misconceptions: Accuracy Vs Velocity

Custom Barrel Misconceptions: Accuracy Vs Velocity

Custom Barrel Misconceptions: Accuracy Vs Velocity

Posted on September 28, 2022 at 8:00 AM by The Biker Lawyers

Ask the Ambassador of Ammo: Rapidfire Firearm FAQ with an Expert

I get emails… but the following was a little different than usual. It was from a viewer of our Ambassador of Ammo videos who lives in Minnesota. He introduced himself as Anthony, but as you will probably discern from his email, this may be a pseudonym. We’ve had several back-and-forth communications… some of which I will summarize here.

 “Hi Russ, My name is Anthony and I’ve been watching your gun videos and I find them interesting and somewhat informative.  I have recently detached from the grid as much as possible and only use the internet while at the public library. I moved from a “Big City” a couple of years ago and have found it best for our family to keep a low profile and become as self-sufficient as possible.” 

As I introduce in the video, he too is a beginner like myself in the world of weapons and he had some questions and topics on which he would like more information. Wade (Owner of Midwest Shooting in Hiawatha, Iowa) is a vet, a gun enthusiast since childhood, and well versed in everything gun related from the political landscape to everyday care and feeding… from sportsman to targets, to self-protection.

So in this week’s blog, we sit in the ROCK 108 studios and ask Wade to answer “Anthony’s” questions.

If the demand is right, we’ll be doing these Q&A videos from time to time, so if you would like any sort of expert advice (except legal advice) send an email to me russ@rock108.com.

Hope today’s video is informative!

Transcription of the video has been provided below for your convenience.

Russ, The Ambassador of Ammo (AoA)

Alright, so here we are in the Rock 108 Studios, and I’ve brought Wade from Midwest shooting in because I’m starting to get questions in the comment section that people want answers to. So I figured every once in a while, we’d do a Q&A with Wade who owns Midwest shooting in Hiawatha. And also, if you have questions, you want to be addressed on anything gun-related, send questions to Russ@rock108.com.

A beginners guide to firearms- and good business

AoA

So, this is from somebody who watched the entire series of videos that we’ve put out so far, Wade. He says:

“The cool thing about your series is that you are just asking questions and letting your host answer them. All questions are good because you admit you’re a beginner. I love that. I’m a beginner also and have so many questions that sometimes gun guys feel are too basic or get annoyed when I ask them…”

Wade

You know, that’s upsetting to hear in a way, because that’s one of the things that gun stores have a bad reputation for because they’ve earned it over decades. The guy behind the counter won’t talk to you unless you know more than that guy. [It’s like you] have to prove your knowledge to prove your worth.

AoA

So you get this to the snooty salesman.

Wade

I don’t even know that they’re snooty, it’s just that they’re rude, and I really don’t like that. And so we really try to make the business so that we welcome new people.

Wade

First and foremost- you know, right wrong, otherwise- whatever you guys think, I’m in this for business. This is how I earn my living, right? And you earn more of a living if you have more customers-

AoA

-Than fewer customers!

Wade

-rather than fewer customers…

AoA

-and happy customers versus Angry customers

Wade

Teach people, something you help them out and that’s ultimately what gets repeat business.

Supply and Demand Problems with Ammunition

AoA

Right. Well, his first question that he has trouble getting answered is about ammunition, he said:

 

“Why is it that some Ammo is easier to get than other ammo? If I have a gun that I can’t get ammo for, what good is the gun? My example is that I have a varmint gun that was once pretty well known for its accuracy, a Remington 222, but it’s been like pulling teeth to get ammunition for it. Should I get rid of that gun? Should I learn to load my own ammo, what’s up?”

Wade

So, the 222- those are cartridges designed in the 1950s for varmint hunting and Ventura Shooters, and it was popular for a few years. Literally, a few years. It’s pretty common, among Farm people. And so farmers, and ranchers, and everything would have, bolt-action, 222.

AoA

Oh, it’s a bolt-action?

Wade

Most likely, I don’t know what kind of gun he has. Most likely it’s a bolt-action. The 222 was replaced by the 223 and the 223 is used by the military. I think the 223 came out in the late 50s- I don’t know the exact year, but the to 22 Magnum, Remington Magnum, was in the running for that- the M16 cartridge basically, but it lost out to the 223. And once you have something that’s so similar and the military is making the cartridge, it’s not… it’s going to lose out, right?

Wade

You know, plain and simple, it’s going to lose out because they have an entire Armory designed to make 223 ammunition and 222 is an offshoot.

AoA

So the consumer model is second ran.

Wade

Yeah, it’s not common. Now, I personally, I personally own a 222. I inherited it from my father who was a farmer and hunted fox and coyote with it. It’s a fun gun to shoot. But the ammunition is hard to come by because there’s not a lot of people who own the Firearms now you know especially people who- a lot of those Firearms, a 222, are in the hands of 70-plus-year-olds and they’re not our shooting like somebody who is younger.

To reload or not to reload, that is the question

AoA

So his question is, should he get rid of the gun or should he load his own ammo?

Wade

I wouldn’t get necessarily rid of the gun unless you just don’t like it or you need the money for something. That’s different. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with it. You can buy ammunition for it. But these times with all the supply chain issues and the stuff we’ve had through the pandemic, it’s not being made.

Wade

The manufacturers simply aren’t making it because they can make 223 and sell every round. You can make they’re not going to make an auto one-off. And so all these older cartridges and these one-off cartridges are flat-out not being made right now.

AoA

And that’s right now because of the supply chain. Okay.

Wade

And if you go to load your own, the problem right now is you’re not gonna be able to get primers if you haven’t, been loading for years and years, and have a, have your own stockpile of primers, that’s going to be hard.


How to get started reloading your own ammunition (considerations for rarer guns)

AoA

Well, that’s his next question we can get into detail about. He said:

“you will note that there are many things sold by dealers for those gun enthusiasts who reload their own shells…”

AoA

I saw this weekend when I was in there, you have a whole back wall dedicated to loading your own ammunition.

“…What are the products? How’s it done? Are there special considerations in purchasing? Is there training offered? How do I get involved in loading my own ammunition?”

Wade

Well, there there’s limited training in the, in the formal sense.

Wade

Once a year, we’ll have a- hydrogen powder will sponsor- a Reloading event with us once a year. And it’s just an overview for people really to more as an advertisement to get them interested in shooting and explain the process.

Wade

YouTube has some excellent resources on…

AoA

That’s where I was going on when I’m stumped on anything. I go to YouTube first…

Wade

…The challenge with all the YouTube stuff is there’re some people who really know their stuff… And there’re some jackasses. If you’re new. You don’t necessarily know which one is which.


Safety first

AoA

Are there safety concerns with loading, your own ammo?

Wade

Yes. You don’t want to blow yourself up.

AoA

That’s a good point.

Wade

You don’t burn your house down. So don’t blow yourself up. I like all my digits.

AoA

I like having all my fingers, yeah.

Wade

What you get with smokeless powder when you’re reloading is you get pressure within the round and that’s what makes it work, right? The gas is burned fast inside of a tie chamber. That’s what propels the bullet up the barrel.

Wade

If you’re reloading, you just have to be careful. You have to pay attention. It’s not terribly hard and your person who’s asking the questions, 222 is an excellent one to reload simply because ammunition is hard to find and the variety that you may want to hunt with our to shoot with. is often not available even in the best of times.

AoA

So can you reload your old cartridges? Like you go shooting, you’re picking up cartridges off the ground, bring them back to the house and reload those?

Wade

Yeah, that’s exactly what you do you do, punch the primers out, put a new primer in, put the powder in, put the hold on. You have to size it…

AoA

So you don’t have to buy new casings every time.

Wade

No, that’s one of the most expensive, other than the bullet, that’s the most expensive part.

AoA

And you have to pour your on lead for the bullets or can you buy them performed?

Wade

With a rifle, you’re going to buy pre-formed. And so for, so for the 222 they take the same bullets as a 223 does.

And so they’re reloading components for the 222- so, for like the bullets themselves- are readily available everywhere. The powder is the same that’s used in 223 as well, so it’s readily available everywhere. Primers are tough right now, but they will come back.

Wade

So to reload for a 222 is an excellent cartridge to reload for just because- you are correct. It is hard to find.

Customizations- AR-15 components

AoA

Next question!

“When you did the AR segment, Jaden told you that one advantage of the AR is that the parts are modular. Meeting, you could swap out Parts, pretty easily to get what works and is comfortable for you, but it also means you can build your own firearm. You could do a whole segment of things…”

AoA

Okay’s offering advice here,

“you could do a whole segment on things to think about when trying to construct your own AR.”

AoA

What are the things to think about when constructing?

Wade

Well, the AR-15, you are correct, people build their own and there’s entire forums dedicated to every single piece, part of the AR-15, and…

AoA

Of which there’s thousands, right?

Wade

No, no, no, there’s not very many parts. I don’t know exactly how many, but there’s not that many. It’s not a very complicated rifle.

AoA

Okay,

Wade

That’s the whole point of it, okay? Anything that’s military is designed to be very, very easy to use modular, you know, interchangeable parts. So it can be maintained in the field, but these are the D10 springs, and D10s people argue about which company is better. It’s probably made the same and just packaged in a different box.

Wade

But there’s so much to consider. And so many opinions out there. My personal opinion- and you guys can believe, take this for what it is- The thing I focus on most is the barrel because that’s where you going to get your accuracy. And that’s, we’re going to get a lot of your cost. And so depending on the kind of accuracy that you need, there are a lot of different choices for that. Spend the money on the barrel.

Custom barrel misconceptions: Accuracy Vs Velocity

AoA

Okay, so what are your choices in barrels? What, give me some examples.

Wade

A lot of it is the length of the barrel.

AoA

The longer the barrel, the more accurate.

Wade

No, no, no, not at all the longer, the barrel, the more velocity. And the velocity, sometimes people confuse velocity with accuracy because the higher the velocity, the lower, it will drop at distance. And so if you can get it going, another 80 to 100 feet per second it won’t drop much

AoA

It’s gonna stay up longer.

Wade

Yeah,

AoA

It’s like a little blue pill for ammunition,

Wade

That’s right, but it’s not going to necessarily make it more accurate. With the barrels, there’s three different lengths, and gas systems in the barrel- there’s carbene, mid-length, and rifle length. And people can debate about that, people can debate whether they want an M4 style Barrel or not.

Wade

It’s different milling and cuts on it and there’s all different kinds of barrel shapes, barrel sizes, barrel weights, barrel thicknesses, and different kinds of Steel. You know some are Chrome, some are Chromoly. Some are…

AoA

Jesus!

Purpose-driven customization

Wade

There’s just so much that you can debate about but also we have to figure out what your goal is of building your own. . You know, if it’s something for accuracy… or just… I would say most people who build ARs just do it because they want something to build.

Wade

They take some pride in making their own thing.

AoA

Is that a show we can do some time on video like building an AR from scratch?

Wade

Oh yeah, we could do…

AoA

Several.

Wade

Yeah, several.

AoA

That’s kind of cool

Wade

But building your own- you have to if you have a goal of something you want that’s unique or something you want to accurize, or to just make your own, you have lots of options- a Bajillion options. It’s just amazing- the amount of stuff that’s out there.

AoA

That’s it. That’s, that’s the show for this week. Those were excellent questions. Anybody that has questions will do shows like this, as often as we can, you can send them to Ross@Rock108.com Thanks for listening [reading]. Wade, Thanks for coming in.

Wade

Thanks. Russ.

About Russ: The biker community’s Ambassador of Ammo

Known as a professional Radio Gypsy, Russ is the voice of “crazy stories and bad behavior” on Rock 108 every weekday from 10 AM – 2 PM (CST). After a shooting expedition with friends, Russ found a new passion for firearms and is now searching to find the perfect fit to match his needs. Join him as he tests and reviews various guns and targets, learns gun safety, and occasionally blows stuff up every week right here!

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